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[ArmadilloCon 24]

Program Participants

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Daniel Abraham has published over a dozen short stories since 1996, including collaborations with Walter Jon Williams, Sage Walker, Michaela Roessner, and Susan Fry. His novel, Unreal City, will be published in 2004. When he's not writing, he's the director of technical support at a local ISP and spends his days helping confused, hostile people get their email. Right now he's reading Winston Churchill's six-volume history of World War II, Dorothy Dunnett's eight volume House of Niccolo, and anything by Kay Kenyon he can get his hands on. Despite the fact that this was written in May, it's still likely to be true when the con starts. He doesn't live in Austin, but a bunch of his family does -- and the best man from his wedding last year -- so he should feel right at home.

Lou Anders is the editor of the upcoming fiction magazine Argosy, as well as the anthologies Live Without a Net (Roc, July 2003) and Outside the Box (Wildside Press, March 2001). In 2000, he served as the Executive Editor of Bookface.com, and before that he worked as the L.A. Liaison for Titan Publishing Group. He is the author of The Making of Star Trek: First Contact (Titan Books, 1996), and has published over 500 articles in such magazines as International Studio, Dreamwatch, Star Trek Monthly, Babylon 5 Magazine, Sci Fi Universe, Doctor Who Magazine, and Manga Max. His articles have been translated into German and French, and have appeared online at SFSite.com, RevolutionSF.com and InfinityPlus.co.uk. www.louanders.com

Dr. Arlan Andrews, Sr., is a registered professional engineer, member of SFWA, member of Mensa, entrepreneur (founded several Sfnal companies, one a virtual reality software firm formerly on NASDAQ), former Libertarian Party candidate for governor, former missile tracker at White Sands Missile Range, former Bell Labs staff member, former nuclear weapons engineer, former White House Fellow, former Dept. of Commerce Technology Administration fellow, and presently is also a husband, father, grandfather, brother, son, columnist in two Corpus Christi newspapers, mechanical engineering consultant for the Mutual UFO Network, and undeconstructed SF fan, particularly of alternate history, imminent disasters, and near-future stories. He and his wife live on North Padre Island and in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

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Allison Baker is co-founder and managing editor of MonkeyBrain, Inc., an independent imprint specializing in non-fiction genre studies. She is also current Head of Operations for Austin-based Troublemaker Studios, with credits on films such as THE FACULTY, ONCE UPON A TIME IN MEXICO, and the SPY KIDS film series.

Eric Bakutis is an aspiring SFF writer also involved in hobbyist moviemaking. He created both the two hour epic Devil s Covenant, using ID Software s Quake engine, and the short film Escape from the Bastille, using 3D Studio Max. Devils Covenant has been widely distributed on the Internet, published in the Italian gaming magazine The Games Machine, and featured at the SciFi Channel s 2000 Exposure Film Festival. Escape from the Bastille has been downloaded over 500,000 times and featured in Spin magazine and PC Zone Benelux. Eric Bakutis resides in Dallas, Texas, with his fiance and a hyperactive Australian cattledog.

Neal Barrett, Jr's fifty-plus novels and numerous short stories span the field from mystery, sf and fantasy to "off-the-wall" mainstream fiction. He won a Texas Institute of Letters Award in l999 for his novel, "Interstate Dreams." The Washington Post called "The Hereafter Gang" "one of the great American novels..." Bantam published his dual fantasy novels,"The Prophecy Machine" and "The Treachery of Kings. Due next year: "The Prince of Christler Coke," from Golden Gryphon, and "Hitler's Tea Room" (the only decent bar in hell) from Subterranean Press. Visit Neal's web site at www.nealbarrett.com

Kurt Baty is a computer architect, physicist, ancient greek numismatist, and a science fiction fan. Kurt enjoys reading and collecting science fiction booksand also enjoys going to the worldcons, having (by 2002) attended 24 of them so far, starting in Kansas City in 1976. Kurt lives with his wife of 25 years on their acreage on Lake Travis outside of Austin, Texas, where they enjoy their horses and boats. Kurt Baty was (with party buddy Scott Bobo) fan guest of ArmadilloCon 24.

Tom Becker is a fan. He is from California; he only works in the future.

Texas-born Carol Berg's debut series: TRANSFORMATION, REVELATION, and RESTORATION(NAL/Roc) has been called "one of the first great epic fantasy works of the 21st century." (www.thealienonline.net) TRANSFORMATION was a finalist for both the Compton Crook Award and the Barnes & Noble Maiden Voyage Award for the best first sf/fantasy novel of 2000. RESTORATION has been nominated for the Romantic Times Reviewers' Choice Award for the Best Epic Fantasy of 2002. All amazing to a software engineer who majored in math at Rice University so she wouldn't have to write papers. Carol's newest novel, SONG OF THE BEAST, was released in May.

Jayme Lynn Blaschke's fiction has appeared in Interzone and Writers of the Future, among other places. He's been translated into Romanian and Estonian, two languages he struggles to spell, much less read. He serves as fiction editor for RevolutionSF.com and has a collected volume of SF-themed interviews coming out from the University of Nebraska Press in 2004. He lives in New Braunfels, and really likes it when people pretend they know who he is.

Scott Bobo in collaboration with Kurt Baty is best known as a party animal. For the decade of the 90s, at the invitation of WorldCon committees or editorial staff, Scott and Kurt had the pleasure of visiting nearly every fan-hosted party held at a WorldCon and then reviewing them daily in the convention newsletter. Oh, the parties I've seen; the hors d'oeuvres I've tasted; the liquor I've consumed!

Michael Bracken is the author of four novels (All White Girls, Deadly Campaign, Just in Time for Love, and Psi Cops), four short story collections (Bad Girls, Canvas Bleeding, Even Roses Bleed, and Tequila Sunrise), a novella released as a gift-book (In the Town of Dreams Unborn and Memories Dying), and more than 800 shorter works. His short stories have sold to Decadence 3, Expanse, Fantastic, Fantasy Macabre, Hot Blood 12, Midnight, Northern Horror, Oui, Pirate Writings, Weirdbook, and many other publications. He's currently editing his fifth anthology, was short-listed for a Derringer Award, and has received numerous awards for advertising copywriting. He currently lives with his family in Texas.

Ginjer Buchanan, born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania long enough ago to remember the invention of television, discovered science fiction fandom in the late 1960's. Later, she moved to New York where she was employed as a social worker. She was also the consulting editor for the Pocket Books STAR TREK novel program, and a freelance reader for The Science Fiction Book Club. In 1984, she was offered a full time job as an editor at Ace Books. Since she was due for a mid-life career change, she accepted immediately. Her current title is Senior Executive Editor and Marketing Director.

Some of you may remember Liz Burton from last year, when she spent most of the con looking like a train wreck. She has vowed to avoid all parking lots for the duration of this one. A native of Pennsylvania transplanted to Austin in 1998, she discovered she had free time to actually pursue the writing career she'd put off for more years than most people have been alive. The first result was a finalist in the '99 Writers of the Future. She has since published two fantasy novels, a fantasy/erotica novella and has a third novel due in March 2003. Most other times, she's a partner in Zumaya Publications, a Canadian small press, where she oversees the editorial department and does acquisitions.

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So far Lillian Stewart Carl has ten novels in print. One is also available in audio form and eight in electronic form. The eleventh, a contemporary fantasy titled Lucifer's Crown, will appear in September 2003. She has had eighteen mystery, fantasy, and sf short stories published, many of which are available in a collection. Most can be found in electronic form at www.fictionwise.com. Four more are in the pipeline, including a reprint in Worlds Finest Crime and Mystery Stories IV, her second "World's Finest" reprint in a row. Her novel Dust to Dust was Fictionwise's best-selling mystery for 2002, and her novel Shadows in Scarlet made her the top-selling author at Wildside Press in 2002. Her work often features paranormal/fantasy themes and always features plots based on mythology, history, and archaeology. She claims a long-suffering husband, two sons, and an assortment of houseplants she views as rentals--her thumbs are ink-stained, not green. When she's looking for an excuse not to work she knits and needlepoints, reads, and listens to music, especially Scottish rock 'n' reel. And she's proud to announce that she's a Tolkien geek! Lillian's web site is http://www.lillianstewartcarl.com.

Suzy McKee Charnas surfaced in SF in the mid-seventies with a startlingly radical thought experiment, WALK TO THE END OF THE WORLD (1974), a Campbell award finalist. The cycle of four books that sprang from WALK (a futurist, feminist epic about history and myth and how they are made, among many other things) closed in 1999 with THE CONQUEROR'S CHILD, which won the Tiptree Award. Her SF and fantasy works have also won her the Hugo award, the Nebula award, and the Mythopoeic award for young-adult fantasy. Her play "Vampire Dreams" has just been staged in Darmstadt, Germany this spring. MY FATHER'S GHOST, a memoir published in October 2002, is her latest book.

Deborah Chester is the internationally published author of 34 novels, ranging from Regency romances, young adult, science fiction, and fantasy. She is a tenured professor of professional writing in the Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Oklahmoa, where she teaches novel and short story writing. Her latest fantasy, The Queen's Gambit, continues the adventures of Pheresa of Mandria. The King's Betrayal, featuring Faldain and Alexeika of Nether, will be published in December 2003. Chester is currently at work on the next book in the Mandria series.

R. Cat Conrad arrives from Arlington that's Texas, not the national cemetery, although his puns can be deadly and have reportedly jeopardized his allotted nine lives. (Just pretend he's a famous dead artist and purchase his paintings accordingly.) His background includes a degree in fine arts from the University of Science and Arts in Oklahoma. From there, Cat leaned just how far an art degree would take him ... across town and into a 10-year stint with an UnFortunate 500 company ... as an industrial chemist. He often wonders if there isn't some frustrated chemist out there sweating over a drawing board and muttering, "What the hell happened to my resume?" Prolonged exposure to hazardous materials did little to improve Cat's humor, but it did convince him that he wasn't making a better living through chemistry. In 1991 he moved on to greener pastures in preference to becoming a permanent part of the "underground" movement! Currently, in addition to being an award-winning painter and cunning linguist, Cat is making broad brushstrokes as a popular speaker and auctioneer, and continues to gain prominence as a fan entertainer. He has been a featured auctioneer at numerous conventions throughout the Southwest, including the five and a half hour marathon auction of WorldCon 51. Visit his website: www.artistsinresidence.com/cat

Roxanne Longstreet Conrad is the author of Stormriders, The Undead, Red Angel, Cold Kiss, and Slow Burn (as Roxanne Longstreet), as well as Copper Moon, Bridge of Shadows, and Exile, Texas (all as Roxanne Conrad, with Exile coming out in November 2003). Her first novel as Rachel Caine, Ill Wind, will be published in December 2003, with two more in the Wardens series to follow in 2004. She's also very excited to be included a new Buffy essay anthology, coming from BenBella Books in the fall 2003. Outside of writing, she's also a professional web designer and communications manager, a former professional musician and a degreed accountant who accepts no blame for the Enron scandal. (Those were NOT her spreadsheets.) She and her husband, artist R. Cat Conrad, live in Arlington, Texas with their iguanas, a mali uromastyx, and a leopard tortoise named Shelley. Visit her websites: www.artistsinresidence.com/rlc or http://www.rachelcaine.com

Kathryn Cramer is a writer and anthologist , website designer and housewife. She won a World Fantasy Award for best anthology for The Architecture of Fear co-edited with Peter Pautz; she was nominated for a World Fantasy Award for her anthology, Walls of Fear. She co-edited several anthologies of Christmas and fantasy stories with David G. Hartwell and now does the annual Year's Best Fantasy and Year's Best SF with him. She is on the editorial board of The New York Review of Science Fiction, of which she is also Art Director (and for which she has been nominated for the Hugo Award seven times). Her dark fantasy hypertext In Small and Large Pieces was published by Eastgate Systems, Inc.

Bill Crider lives in enchanting Alvin, Texas, where he writes about Sheriff Dan Rhodes (A ROMANTIC WAY TO DIE, Worldwide; RED, WHITE, AND BLUE MURDER, St. Martin's), Humprhey Bogart and Terry Scott (WE'LL ALWAYS HAVE MURDER, iBooks), and other assorted oddball characters, none of whom is based on a real person. Only the animals are real. Bill's lovely wife, Judy, has collaborated with him on a couple of stories including their Anthony Award winner, "Chocolate Moose."

Scott Cupp writes weird short stories on an irregular basis. He lives in San Antonio with his wife Sandi, his two cats (Leon Trotsky and Tawny tiger the Periscope) and way too many books. He is an owner of Adventures in Crime and Space who urges you to buy from their table at the convention. Many of his stories can be found on the web at www.revolutionsf.com in their fiction archives.

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Ellen Datlow is currently editor of SCI FICTION, the fiction area of SCIFI.COM, the SCIFI Channel's website. She was fiction editor of OMNI for over seventeen years, during which time she published everyone from William Gibson, Bruce Sterling, Lucius Shepard, and Pat Cadigan to Joyce Carol Oates, Jonathan Carroll, and Patricia Highsmith. She has also edited a number of anthologies, including the annual Year's Best Fantasy and Horror (with Terri Windling), A Wolf at the Door and the forthcoming Swan Sister (for middle grades), the young adult anthology The Green Man, and the adult fairy tales anthology series beginning with Snow White, Blood Red. Solo, she has edited Blood is Not Enough, Little Deaths, Alien Sex, Lethal Kisses, an sf anthology on the theme of endangered species, Vanishing Acts, and the forthcoming ghost story anthology The Dark. She has won the World Fantasy Award six times, the Bram Stoker Award once, and the 2002 Hugo Award. In addition, Datlow consults for Tor Books. Her website is at: http://www.datlow.com.

Aaron de Orive is a screenwriter who discovered that his soul was not valuable enough to trade for a successful Hollywood career, so he settled instead for a comfortable living in the video game industry. He has occupied the Lead Writer/Story Director positions on Ultima Online 2, Anarchy Online, and most recently Star Wars Galaxies. Currently the Lead Writer/Minister of Fiction on Tabula Rasa, he has concluded that unraveling the mathematical mystery of PHI is far easier and more pleasant than writing Gungan dialogue. What's the best advice Aaron can give aspiring young writers? Never choose a demon alphabetically from a phone book.

Former Kansan Bradley Denton and his wife Barb moved to Austin in 1988, and in the years since then Brad has written the novels Buddy Holly Is Alive and Well on Ganymede, Blackburn, and Lunatics, as well as most of the stories in The Calvin Coolidge Home for Dead Comedians, A Conflagration Artist, and One Day Closer to Death. An automobile accident in 1998 transported him from an alternate-reality Texas overrun with killer emus to an alternate-reality Texas overrun with killer Republicans. His latest story is "Timmy and Tommy's Thanksgiving Secret" in Witpunk.

John Douglas was born in Toronto and started reading SF in his teens. His first convention was Lunacon 1969 and he pubbed his ish, joined an apa, worked on local conventions and on several worldcons. He started working in publishing in 1978 at Berkley Books, was SF Editor at Pocket Books/Simon & Schuster (1978-1983), where he helped launch the Timescape imprint, at Avon Books/William Morrow (1983-1995), where he helped launch the AvoNova imprint, and at HarperCollins/HarperPrism (1995-1999). He has been freelancing since late 1999, and is currently News Editor of Chronicle (formerly Science Fiction Chronicle). He is delighted to have lots more personal reading time since he stopped working full-time in trade publishing and is catching up on a 20 year backlog of great books from places he didn't work.

Gardner Dozois is the editor of ASIMOV'S SCIENCE FICTION magazine, and of the long-running annual anthology series THE YEAR'S BEST SCIENCE FICTION from St. Martin's Press, now in its TWENTIETH ANNUAL COLLECTION. (Last year's collection, the NINETEENTH ANNUAL COLLECTION, just won the Locus Award as the Year's Best Anthology.) He has won twelve Hugo Awards as Year's Best Editor, and two Nebula Awards for his own short fiction. He is the author or editior of more than ninety books, and lives in Philadelphia.

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Dotti Enderle refuses to grow up! (Much to the embarrassment of family and friends.) She is the author of the children's mystery series, Fortune Tellers Club (Llewellyn Worldwide Ltd.) and a kazillion other stories and poems for kids. She began her publishing career in 1995, writing for popular children's magazines. As a professional storyteller, Dotti has entertained at numerous schools, libraries, museums and festivals. She takes pride in her vast collection of original stories and folktales, and specializes in "participation" stories, allowing the audience to join in the fun. She lives in Texas with her

Jennifer Evans's short work has appeared in Asimov's. She's taught overcoming writer's block and helped to start the Writers' League of Texas. She lives in Luling with her two civet cats, Sars and Shining Pathology. husband, two daughters and a lazy cat named Oliver.

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Mark Finn writes novels, short stories, scripts, and essays from his home in South Austin. He is the author of two novels, "Gods New and Used" and "Year of the Hare," published by the erstwhile Clockwork Storybook. In 1997, he started writing Finn's Wake, a weekly e-column/editorial, currently hosted on www.revolutionSF.com. His novel, "The Transformation of Lawrence Croft," is also being serialized on RevolutionSF.com. As a member of the Robert E. Howard United Press Association, he has written about the author in an upcoming book of Texas writers for UT Press and contributed an introduction to his work in "Waterfront Fists: The Complete Fight Stories of Robert E. Howard."

Brad W. Foster is an illustrator, cartoonist, writer, publisher, and whatever other labels he can use to get him through the door! He's won the Fan Artist Hugo a few times (5), picked up a Chesley award, and turned a bit of self-publishing started over twenty five years ago into the Jabberwocky Graphix publishing empire. (Total number of employees: 2.) His strange drawings and cartoons have appeared in over a thousand science fiction fanzines, just for the hell of it. On a more professional level he has worked as an illustrator for various genre magazines and publishers, the better known among those being Amazing Stories and Dragon. In comics he had his own series some years back, Mechthings, and he even got to play with the "big boys" of comics for a few years at the official "Big Background Artist" of Image Comics's Shadowhawk. Known throughout the world (though most of the world doesn't know it yet) for his intricate pen and ink work, outside our genre it is possible you've seen more of his work in titles as varied as Cat Fancy, Cavalier, or Highlights for Children. Most recently he has completed covers for a couple of Yard Dog Press books, illustrations for magazines such as Space & Time and Talebones, and has even managed to work a dragon into the official poster for the 2003 Tulsa Oktoberfest.

Andrew Fox grew up in Miami, Florida and has lived in New Orleans, Louisiana since 1990. He wrote his first SF story at the tender age of eight. Thirty years later, his first book, Fat White Vampire Blues, will be published by Ballantine Books in July, 2003. A sequel, Bride of the Fat White Vampire, will follow in 2004. His day job is state manager for the Louisiana Commodity Supplemental Food Program, a federally funded nutrition program for low-income senior citizens and families. Since 1995, he has been a member of a writing workshop group founded by award-winning SF author George Alec Effinger.

cathy freeze. horror and dark fantasy/urban fantasy writer--published neopro. Ideomancer horror editor. composition teacher at TAMUCC. member of the onlinewritingworkshop. old lady with a twisted sense of humor.

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John K. Gibbons is a local fan and writer who has chaired or co-chaired 4 ArmadilloCons including this one. His most recent story was published in Analog. He is also a volunteer speaker for NASA's Jet propulsion Laboratory through their Solar System Ambassador program.

Steven Gould is the author of five-and-a-half novels: JUMPER, WILDSIDE, HELM, BLIND WAVES, GREENWAR (with Laura J. Mixon), and JUMPERS (just turned in.) In addition, his short fiction has appeared in most of the major SF magazines as well as various anthologies. He has been nominated for the Hugo twice, the Nebula once, the Prometheus award once, and won the Hal Clement award for YA novel (for WILDSIDE.) At the time he wrote this bio, he lived outside Houston, Texas with his wife, SF author Laura J. Mixon, and his two daughters, Emma and Carita. Who knows where they are now?

Mitchell Graham was born in New York City in 1950. He attended college at Ohio State University on a fencing scholarship and went on to earn a law degree from the University of Texas. After practicing law for twenty years he went back to school and received a doctorate in Neuropsychology from the University of Miami. He has represented the United States many times in international fencing competitions. Along the way Mitchell won or placed in the finals of over 83 separate fencing competitions. Mr. Graham's first novel "The Fifth Ring," won the prestigious Delmont-Ross Literary Contest and was awarded the gold medal in fantasy and the overall grand prize. It recently made the Locus national bestseller list. His second book, "The Emerald Cavern," is expected out in late December of this year. He lives in Miami, Florida with his fiancée.

Eileen Gunn writes short stories; her fiction has twice been nominated for the Hugo Award. She is the editor and publisher of The Infinite Matrix, a webzine that features a daily weblog by Bruce Sterling and original fiction by Neal Barrett, Jr., Michael Swanwick, Ursula K. Le Guin, Gene Wolfe, Rudy Rucker (Sr. & Jr.), Richard Kadrey, and others. She is currently chairman of the Board of Directors of the Clarion West Writers Workshop.

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Peggy Hailey is the Books Editor for RevolutionSF.com and the Head Buyer for Book People Bookstore in Austin. In addition to RevolutionSF.com, her reviews and articles have appeared at Readerville.com, Book People.com, Stomp of Approval.com, and in The Readerville Journal. She has worked in bookstores for over 12 years. In her spare time she reads far too much and, given half a chance, will talk your ear off about cephalopods.

Beverly Hale is basically just trying to get back to her native Texas and write. Unfortunately, she keeps taking wrong turns that have sent her to places like Los Angeles and Washington, DC where she finds occupations that don't leave her much time for writing. Now she and her husband are moving a dog, a cat, 10,000+ books and whatever furniture will fit on the truck back to Oklahoma City (it's still not Texas, but it's closer). Bev has been published in comic book scripts, roleplaying games, short story anthologies, an Indian/Pakistani cookbook, a children's book, a ghostwritten book of love poetry (and no, she won't tell you what name she wrote it under) and now her first novel, THE ESSENCE OF STONE (Yard Dog Press, Dec, 2002). When not writing, Bev is a meeting planner (who has seen hotels and airports all over the United States----mostly just hotels and airports, sigh) and she hopes the move back to Oklahoma will give her a bit more time to write as she has just started the sequel to STONE and is also working on a second fantasy set in Kansas City, circa 1910.

Jennifer A. Hall is Editorial Director of Locus magazine. She also writes freelance, and has published children's stories as well as articles and essays on a variety of subjects.

Marty Halpern has been an editor for Golden Gryphon Press since 1999, acquiring works of fiction, working with authors and artists, and managing the goldengryphon.com web site. Along with Golden Gryphon publisher Gary Turner, Marty was a finalist for the 2001 World Fantasy Award/Special Award, Professional. 2003 marks the publication of two anthologies which he coedited: Witpunk (with Claude Lalumière, Four Walls Eight Windows) and The Silver Gryphon (with Gary Turner, Golden Gryphon Press). Before the technology bust of 2001, Marty worked as a business systems analyst, specializing in SAP software security authorizations. He lives in SiliconValley.

David G. Hartwell is a Senior Editor of Tor/Forge Books. He is the proprietor of Dragon Press, publisher and bookseller, which publishes The New York Review of Science Fiction. He is the author of Age of Wonders and the editor of many anthologies, including The Dark Descent; Masterpieces of Fantasy and Enchantment; The World Treasury of Science Fiction, Northern Stars, The Ascent of Wonder (co-edited with Kathryn Cramer) and a number of Christmas anthologies, among others. Recently he co-edited his eighth annual paperback volume of Year's Best SF, and co-edited the second Year's Best Fantasy annual volume. He has won the Eaton Award, the World Fantasy Award, the Science Fiction Chronicle Poll, and has been nominated for the Hugo Award twenty-seven times to date.

Teddy Harvia is an anagram of David Thayer. He has drawn cute aliens for fan publications for over 25 years. He served as cochair for the bid to hold the WorldCon in Cancun. He worked on publications for LoneStarCon 2. His ambition is to be a published SF writer. He lives in Dallas with his spouse Diana and beautiful daughter Matilda. He maintains a website on the Hugo awards.

2003 will see a whole slew of comics from Jason Henderson, including Image's SWORD OF DRACULA, Moonstone Comics' SOULCATCHER, and Humanoids Comics' CLOCKWERX. Jason has published five novels, including the LOCUS best-seller HIGHLANDER: THE ELEMENT OF FIRE, and two Marvel novels, THE INCREDIBLE HULK: ABOMINATIONS and X-MEN & SPIDER-MAN: TIME'S ARROW, BOOK 1. He's the screenwriter and writer for COMMAND & CONQUER: RED ALERT 2 and COMMAND & CONQUER: RENEGADE, two national #1-selling selling computer games. His website is at http://www.jasonhenderson.com.

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Texas writer Katharine Eliska Kimbriel has published two alternative history fantasies of dark magics. The first, NIGHT CALLS, LOCUS Magazine described as an adult "Little House on the Prairie with werewolves and vampires." The most recent, KINDRED RITES, gathered cheers from her peers--writers such as Jane Yolen, Laurell K. Hamilton and Andre Norton all say "More Allie!" Her published novels include FIRE SANCTUARY, FIRES OF NUALA, and HIDDEN FIRES, stand-alone science fiction novels that take place on the same planet. Short fiction has appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, AMAZING!, and such anthologies as LORD OF THE FANTASTIC, THE BLOOD OF TEN CHIEFS, and WEREWOLVES.

An award-winning editor, writer, and bookseller, Rick Klaw was the co-founder and managing editor of MOJO Press and the former fiction editor for RevolutionSF. One of the more opinionated people in an industry of opinionated people, Klaw regularly produces his popular column "Geeks With Books" for SFSite. Klaw's Geek Confidential: Echoes From the 21st Century, a collection of his essays, reviews, and other things Klaw, premieres at this years Armadillocon. (Which is also his tenth as a guest.) He has written for The Austin Chronicle, Weird Business, The Big Book of the Weird Wild West, Gangland, Michael Moorcock's Multiverse, SFWeekly, Nova Express and other venues.

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Joe R. Lansdale was born in Gladewater, Texas October 28, 1951. After graduating high school, he took college courses, but decided his main interest was writing. Working a variety of jobs, farmer, janitor, etc., he wrote in his spare time, selling immediately. In 1981 he became a full time writer and has practiced his craft ever since. He is the author of over 200 short stories, articles and essays, as well as twenty novels, and several short story collections. He has also edited or co-edited seven anthologies - five fiction, two nonfiction. He is well known for his series of crime/suspense adventures featuring Hap Collins and Leonard Pine: The Two Bear Mambo, Cold in July, Savage Season, Bad Chili, Rumble Tumble, The Boar, and Freezer Burn. Several of them have been optioned for film. Among them, Mucho Mojo, a New York Times Notable Book, has recently been scripted for film by Oscar winner Ted Tally. His novel A Fine Dark Line was a National Bestseller. His better known short story collections are By Bizarre Hands, Writer of the Purple Rage, Electric Gumbo, The Lansdale Reader, High Cotton, Selected Stories by Joe R. Lansdale, and a unique graphic story collection of his work titled Atomic Chili, The Illustrated Joe R. Lansdale. He has also edited anthologies like the ground-breaking Razored Saddles and Dark at Heart which contained many "Best of Nominees", including Lansdale's own award winning novella, "Events Concerning a Nude Fold-Out Found in a Harlequin Romance." He has scripted teleplays for the Emmy winning, animated Batman series, and sold numerous options and screenplays to film. His novella Bubba Ho-Tep was recently filmed, directed by Don Coscarelli of Phantasm and Beastmaster fame, and starring Bruce Campbell and Ossie Davis. It has received numerous fine reviews, and is opening in selected theaters around the nation beginning in September 2003. He has written for comics, including the award winning DC Comics Jonah He x series, Two Gun Mojo, Riders of the Worm and Such, and Shadow's West. He also scripted It Crawls, the comic that revived the Lone Ranger, for Topps. He had his own comic series at Dark Horse, featuring adaptations of his short stories and the novel, Dead in the West. Avatar Press is now adapting his novels and stories to comics. He is a member of the Texas Institute of Letters, and has won numerous awards for his work: The Edgar Award for Best Novel (The Bottoms) of 2000, six Bram Stokers, the British Fantasy Award, the American Mystery Award, the Horror Critics Award, the Shot in the Dark International Crime Writer's Award, two New York Times Notable Books, the Booklist Editor's Award, the Critic's Choice Award, the Inkpot Award, the Herodotus Award for Historical Crime Fiction, Burroughs Bibliophiles Award for contributions to the legacy of Edgar Rice Burroughs, and others. A martial artist for over 30 years, Joe R. Lansdale is the Founder/Director and Grandmaster of Shen Chuan, Martial Science, under which the linking divisions Shen Chuan, Shen Chuan Streetboxing, Shen Chuan Stickboxing and Shen Chuan Aikibujutsu are housed.

Alexis Glynn Latner's novelettes and short stories have been published in Analog Science Fiction Magazine, Amazing Stories, and the anthology Bending the Landscape: Horror. Her short story "Kindred" won the 2002 Gaylactic Spectrum Award for short fiction. She also writes magazine articles about aviation, technology and education, works at the Rice University library in Houston, Texas, and teaches creative writing in the Rice University School of Continuing Studies. For fun and real-life adventure, she flies sailplanes.

This month sees the release of The Dragon of Despair, the third of Jane Lindskold's novels featuring Firekeeper -- a feral woman raised by wolves. The series began with Through Wolf's Eyes and continued in Wolf Head, Wolf's Heart. The latter is due for release in August with a great new cover by Julie Bell. Lindskold has had published a dozen or so novels, and fifty-some short stories. Forthcoming works include The Buried Pyramid, an archaeological fantasy set in 1870's Egypt, and a fourth Firekeeper novel. Lindskold lives in New Mexico with her husband, archaeologist Jim Moore. Learn more at www.janelindskold.com.

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Lee Martindale's short fiction has appeared in numerous places, most recently the online magazine _Elysian Fiction_ and her third collection from Yard Dog Press, _Hell Hath No Fury...: Five Bardic Tales_. She edited Meisha Merlin's first original anthology, _Such A Pretty Face_, and has a story in its second, Lee & Miller's _Low Port_. When not slinging fiction, Lee is a bard, swashbuckler, songwriter and filker, public speaker, Lifetime Active member of SFWA and a member of the SCA. She and husband George live in Plano, TX, keeping friends in the loop at http://www.HarpHaven.net.

Author of the bestselling Mithgar series, Dennis L. McKiernan was born April 4, 1932, in Moberly, Missouri. A U.S. Air Force veteran of the Korean War, he received a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Missouri and an M.S. from Duke. Dennis spent thirty-one years at Bell Laboratories in research and development--in antiballistic missile defense systems, in software for telephone systems, and in various management think-tank activities--before becoming a full-time writer. Currently living with his wife in Tucson, Arizona, Dennis began writing novels in 1977 while recuperating from a close encounter of the crunch kind with a 1967 red and black Plymouth Fury (Dennis lost: it ran over him: Plymouth 1, Dennis 0). He is presently working on the second book of a five-book series set in the world of Faery. http://home.att.net/~dlmck C. J. Mills has been writing since before 6th grade. She has written six sf novels (five published), two historicals (one published and Spur Award nominee), and one suspense thriller. She and her husband Jerry moved to Austin two years ago, but kept their Minnesota house for summer use. She also teaches at writers' workshops, is a mental health worker, and kindergarten-to-12rh grade German teacher.

C. J. Mills has been writing since before 6th grade. She has written six sf novels (five published), two historicals (one published and Spur Award nominee), and one suspense thriller. She and her husband Jerry moved to Austin two years ago, but kept their Minnesota house for summer use. She also teaches at writers' workshops, is a mental health worker, and kindergarten-to-12rh grade German teacher.

A native New Mexican, Laura J. Mixon was born in Roswell (no connection with the incident, she always says.though actually there is; buy her a beer sometime and she'll tell you about it). She's been writing stories since she was eight (in crayon with a yarn binding, illustrated), and SF novels since she discovered Clifford D. Simak at age eleven (mercifully, those early efforts remain unpublished). She's a chemical engineer by training and an environmental engineer by profession. She's also a Clarion graduate ('81) and a former Peace Corps volunteer (Kenya / '81-83). She tends to write hard SF with a sociological twist. Her writing explores the impacts of technological change on family and gender roles; the effect of technology on the environment and vice versa; the nature of consciousness; genetic experimentation; and Christ-knows-what-all. Telepresence and the human-machine interface often feature prominently. Weird aliens and unlikely gravitational effects have also been known to creep in. Her latest book, Burning The Ice, a first-contact intrigue set on an icy moon of a Jovian world many light-years from our own, came out from Tor Books in hardcover in August 2002, and is due out in paperback in early 2004. To her delight, it has garnered starred reviews in Kirkus and Publisher's Weekly. Her current project, working title Wave, is an sf trilogy with technogenic machines, smart tumors, massive engineering projects, genetically tormented shapeshifters, and the biochemical underpinnings of mysticism (or is that the mystical underpinnings of biology?). Watch this space for further updates...

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Jess Nevins is a reference librarian at Sam Houston State University. After several years achieving fame in the incredibly small pond that is online comics fandom he is leaping into a much bigger body of water, first with the June 2003 publication of HEROES AND MONSTERS: THE UNOFFICIAL GUIDE TO THE LEAGUE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN and then with the Fall 2004 publication of THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF FANTASTIC VICTORIANA and the Winter 2005 publication of THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF PULP HEROES.

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The lovely Cary Osborne lives in Norman, Oklahoma, and is the author of 6 published novels. She also authored Winter Queen under the pseudonym Devin Cary. Later this year, her new fantasy novel Iah's Way: When God Was Stolen will be published by Grey & Chenault. An alternate history, Cross Over the River, is under consideration by another publisher. She is also working on yet another fantasy, still untitled, two romantic mysteries, and an historical novel. (It's amazing what being unemployed can mean in giving one time to write.) Most of her published short stories have been in the horror genre. One of her passions is American history from 1750 through the Civil War. (Cary did not write this, just so no one thinks she calls herself "lovely.")

James A. Owen is the author and illustrator of the long running graphic novel series STARCHILD, the author of the acclaimed MYTHENWELT novels from Festa Verlag in Germany, and the Editorial Director of the Arts magazine INTERNATIONAL STUDIO, and the fiction magazine, ARGOSY. His Studio, Coppervale International, is currently in preproduction on three feature films based on his work.

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Spike Parsons admits she did not read SF as a child; she entered fandom as an adult, both eyes open, through the door of feminist SF. In fact, she was introduced to fandom in the weight room of a YWCA. This is something that can be done if you are living in Madison, the home the world's only feminist SF convention, WisCon. Besides WisCon, Spike has worked on some other conventions, including Potlatch and worldcons. An old style fan, she has also edited a clubzine and her own fanzine (I-94). She's just completed 3 years assisting with the Tiptree Award. Since the Texas Nasfic she has been lurking on the FACT membership rolls. Her greatest honor was being chosen as Armadillocon Fan GoH. She now lives in California, but instead of a cat she has Tom Becker, who is the real F/SF reader in the family.

Lawrence Person is a science fiction writer living in Austin, Texas. His short fiction has appeared in Asimov's, Analog, Fear, and several anthologies. He also edits the Hugo-nominated SF critical magazine Nova Express, and is a member of the long-running Turkey City Writer's Workshop. His non-fiction has appeared in National Review, Reason, Whole Earth Review, The Freeman, The World & I, Science Fiction Eye, The New York Review of Science Fiction, and Slashdot.org. His latest story was "morlock Chili" in the June Asimov's. He owns a very large library. He also makes a mean batch of salsa.

Doug Potter's book illustration include the award winning two-volume collection of Bradley Denton's short stories from Wildside Press, and a children's book written by Joe Lansdale, Something Lumber This Way Comes, from Subterranean Press. Geek Confidential by Rick Klaw from Monkeybrain will include the comic book adaptation of "Bob the Dinosaur Goes to Disneyland," by Joe Lansdale, Klaw, and Potter. He continues to do editorial cartooning for The Austin Chronicle, where his work has appeared for more than fifteen years. His work can be found on the Internet at the Austin Chronicle site (www.auschron.com), at Revolution SF (www.revolutionsf.com), and at on own web site at www.geocities.com/dougiec3. Current projects include illustrating Duck Feet by Joe Lansdale at Subterranean Press and illustrating the cover for Howard Waldrop's new collection, also from Subterranean.

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Dusty Rainbolt took over 15 years to complete her first science fiction novel, a humorous galactic adventure entitled All the Marbles, published by Yard Dog Press. Recently she's written several award-winning articles including a monthly advice column co-written with a feline named Hobbes for a Dallas pet magazine. She is currently writing her next book, Kittens for Dummies, which her editor insists be finished in less than 15 years. It should be out in mid-December.

Jessica Reisman lives in Austin, Texas and likes tequila, umbrellas, and moths. An animal and movie lover, she has a master's degree in creative writing, but found Clarion (West) much more to the point. She has written locally produced and nationally aired radio plays, short films, film reviews, and lots of other stuff. Her fiction has appeared in The Third Alternative, Realms of Fantasy and in Scifiction on SciFi.com. Forthcoming publications include "Nights at the Crimea," in Kabbalah: The Magic of Solomon.

Carrie Richerson's short stories have appeared in F&SF, Realms of Fantasy, Amazing, Pulphouse, the anthologies Gothic Ghosts, More Phobias, Swords of the Rainbow, and the science fiction and horror volumes of the Bending the Landscape series. She is a two-time Campbell Award nominee but, alas, never a bride. She lives in Austin, Texas, where her writing is supervised by Jeep the Blue-Eyed Wonderdog and the notorious feline escape artist Houdini.

Chris Roberson is the author of the novels VOICES OF THUNDER, CYBERMANCY INCORPORATED, SET THE SEAS ON FIRE, and ANY TIME AT ALL, which have been reviewed favorably by THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION, ASIMOV'S, SF SITE, REVOLUTIONSF, and INFINITY PLUS. His short stories have appeared on Fantastic Metropolis, RevolutionSF, Opi8, and in the Roc anthology LIVE WITHOUT A NET (July, 2003). In addition to serving as associate editor for INTERNATIONAL STUDIO (Coppervale Press), he is the publisher of MonkeyBrain, Inc., whose upcoming titles include contributions from Michael Moorcock, Jess Nevins, Rick Klaw, Alan Moore, Paul Di Filippo, Jeff VanderMeer, and China Meiville (http://www.monkeybrainbooks.com ).

Mary Rosenblum began her writing career with a sale to Gardner Dozois, editor of 'Asimov's' at the 1988 Clarion West Writers Workshop. Since then, she has published more than 50 short stories, along with 3 SF novels and a hardcover collection of her short fiction., "Synthesis and Other Realities', from Arkham House. She was a recipient of the Compton Crook Award for Best First Novel. Her novella, 'Gas Fish' won the 'Readers Award' from 'Asimov's Magazine', and was also a nominee for the Hugo award. A few years back, she took a break from SF to write a mystery series for Putnam Berkeley as Mary Freeman, with a series of four 'Rachel O'Connor' mysteries. Recently she has returned to her short fiction roots, with new stories appearing in both 'Asimov's' and 'Ellery Queen' magazine, and is now back in the SF fold for good! She lives in rural Oregon where she trains and shows dogs in obedience and tracking, raises assorted livestock, and grows most of her own food when she isn't writing or teaching for Long Ridge Writers Group.

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Tony Salvaggio is an animator and writer, and avid fan of anime, video games, and pop culture of the US and Japan. Having spent countless hours playing video games in the 80's he decided to make it a career in the 90's and beyond. He was lead animator on Spongebob Squarepants: Revenge of the Flying Dutchman for PS2 and Gamecube which recently won a Nickelodeon Kids Choice Award. His video game design ideas and anime addiction lead him to try his hand at writing and he teamed up with Jason Henderson to co-write comics and screenplays. With one comic well in the works and waiting to be published later this year; He has turned to video game design, pitching new comics and screenplay ideas, playing in a band (Undead Theory), hanging out with his wife (Rain Nox an accomplished musician and now video game music composer), and filling the rest of his time with as much coffee and video games as will fill the extra time.

Patrice E. Sarath is a beginning writer and "graduate" of the ArmadilloCon Writer's Workshop. Her credits include sales to Realms of Fantasy and Black Gate; She has a story in 2003's Year's Best Fantasy 3. She lives in Austin with her family and is a member of the SF writer's group The Slug Tribe.

Born in London, England, more years ago than she cares to remember, Kate Saundby was raised in the UK and educated in Belgium. She emigrated to the USA in 1957 as a GI bride and presently lives in rural northwest Tennessee with her second husband, Herman, and a laid back orange cat named Clifty. Kate says the best way to describe her books is Star Wars meets As The World Turns. Her newest title, A Distant Bell, which is a sequel to her historical time travel, A Circle of Arcs, is scheduled for release by Double Dragon Publishing in mid to late summer 2003. Kate is also the author of an eleven title SF/Fantasy saga, The Chronicles of Nublis. All of these titles are available at http://www.double-dragon-ebooks.com/Authors/KateS.html
Website URL: http://www.authorsden.com/visit/author.asp?AuthorID=1745

Lucius Shepard lives in Vancouver, Washington. His work has been honored with the Hugo, Nebula, World Fantasy, Locus, and Theodore Sturgeon Awards. His latest publication is the short novel, Louisiana Breakdown. Forthcoming is the novel A Handbook of American Prayer, the short story collection, Trujillo, and a mini collection, Two Trains Running.

Not too long ago a friend of Bradley Sinor's commented that Brad wrote family stories. "Yeah," Brad told him, "If you're related to the Addam's Family or one of Dracula's relatives." Be that as it may, Brad has seen more than his short stories published in the last few years in such anthologies as WARRIOR FANTASTIC, KNIGHT FANTASTIC, DRACULA IN LONDON, BUBBAS OF THE APOCOLYPSE, MERLIN, LORD OF THE FANTASTIC, and others. He will have more out in 2003 and 200in anthologies such as HAUNTED HOLIDAYS, THE MAGIC SHOP and ROTTEN RELATIONS. . Two collections of his short fiction have been released by Yard Dog Press, DARK AND STORMY NIGHTS and IN THE SHADOWS. He has also seen his non-fiction appear in DARK ZONES, STARLOG , PERSONAL DEMONS, ENTERPRISE, CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY PATROLMAN, TOP DECK, and LONG ISLAND MONTHLY among many, many others.

Mark Shepherd writes fantasy and science fiction, and has published the Baen novels Wheels of Fire ('92), Prison of Souls ('94) (both with Mercedes Lackey), and the sequel Escape from Roksamur ('97); The urban fantasies Elvendude (94), Spiritride ('97), Lazerwarz ('99); and with Yard Dog Press, Blackrose Avenue ('01). He has also appeared in the anthologies Bending the Landscape (White Wolf), Swords of the Rainbow (Alyson), Lammas Night and Sword of Ice (Baen), Magic: the Gathering, and Bubbas of the Apocalypse. He is currently developing an unsold epic fantasy, The Isles of Pendalon, and a post-apocalyptic science fiction novel for Yard Dog Press, Madlander.

Caroline Spector is bigger than a breadbox and smaller than Jumbo the Elephant and while not as vast as Walt Whitman, she's working on it. She is currently working on her fifth novel. Her first two novels, never before available in English, will be available in electronic form by the end of the year.

Warren Spector spent far too many years in school before realizing he was born to be a game developer. His mother may one day forgive him for leaving the University of Texas a dissertation short of completing his Ph.D. but he isn't holding his breath. In the 20 years since he broke his mother's heart, Warren has written, designed and edited more boardgames and roleplaying games than he cares to remember; he has also produced fifteen computer and videogames. Most recently, he produced and directed the award-winning, soon-to-possibly-be-a-movie, maybe, Deus Ex. Currently, Warren heads up Ion Storm, where development is underway on Thief 3 and Deus Ex: Invisible War. In addition to his game development efforts, Warren is married to author, Caroline Spector, writes and lectures regularly on game design and development, owns far too many books, loves basketball (Let's go Knicks! Hook 'em Horns!) and plays rhythm guitar in a band called Two-Headed Baby (appearing soon at an Armadillocon dance near you).

Wen Spencer is finalist for the John Campbell Award for Best New Writer. The Compton Crook winning Alien Taste was Wen Spencer's first professional sale. It marked the start of the Ukiah Oregon Series: Alien Taste, Tainted Trail (nominated for the 2002 Romantic Times Bookclub Reviewer's Choice Award for Best SF) and the newly released Bitter Waters. LOCUS praises Bitter Waters, saying: As usual, it all ends up an engrossing, thrill-filled adventure, full of fascinating alien - and human - weirdness. Her new novel, Tinker, will be released in November as a hardcover by Baen. Excerpts from all her novels can be found at her web site at www.wenspencer.com.

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Mikal Trimm writes stories and poems in several genres. His work has been published in the U.S., Canada, and Australia, as well as in several online magazines. Some of his most recent work may be found in "SAY..Was That A Kiss?", "Star*Line", "Snow Monkey", and "Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine". He is also and editor for the online magazine "Ideomancer" (www.ideomancer.com). Mikal lives in Lockhart, Texas, along with his family and a growing list of neuroses. V
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Gordon van Gelder was an editor for St. Martin's Press from 1988 through 2000, during which time he helped unleash on the world books like =Blackburn, Zod Wallop,= and =The Hooterville Handbook.= Since 1996 he has been the editor of =The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction= and he now serves as the magazine's publisher as well as handling editorial duties. He lives in Hoboken, New Jersey.

Dennis Virzi has been active in fandom since the mid 1970's. He's chaired a Bubonicon and is one of the founding board members of the New Mexico Science Fiction Society. Since coming to Texas in 1981 he has worked on many local and national conventions. Dennis is presently the secretary of the Austin Literary Arts Maintenance Society. He also serves on the grant committee for ALAMO.

Pat (Mueller) Virzi was born at an early age and has been trying to catch up ever since. She jumped into fanzine and convention fandom in the Midwest, then drove herself to become an Arizona convention fan and fake gamer. After her move to Austin, she helped to FACT up conventions and fanzines there; she was also a Fan GoH at an earlier Armadillocon. She now works in the DFW area as a Digital Assets Manager (she knows where at least eight of ten fingers are at any given moment). Husband Dennis Virzi and daughter Madeline are counted as Analog Assets. She has only shot one armadillo this year; the rest were very lucky. She wants to pub her ish again, but Real Soon Now gets in the way.

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Sage Walker missed you guys so much that she gave up and started writing again. She's currently working on a quarter of a novel. The other quarters belong to Daniel Abraham, Michaela Roessner, and Walter Jon Williams. The collaboration is noisy, exasperating, and delightful. She hopes the book will be, too. Her novel Whiteout won the LOCUS award for best first novel in '96. The last short fiction was "Hunting Mother," in Constance Ash's anthology Not of Woman Born.

Don Webb has had 50+ stories on Year's Best lists, and 28 in anthologies. New books include Security Alert (about computer security) and The Complete Idiot's Guide to Egyptian Myths (late 2003 -- early 2004).

Martha Wells (http://www.marthawells.com) was born in 1964 in Fort Worth, Texas, and graduated from Texas A&M University with a B.A. in Anthropology. Her first novel, "The Element of Fire," was published by Tor in hardcover in July 1993 and was a finalist for the 1993 Compton Crook/Stephen Tall Award and a runner-up for the 1994 Crawford Award. The French edition was a 2003 Imaginales Award nominee. Her second novel for Tor, "City of Bones," was a 1995 hardcover and June 1996 paperback release. Her third novel "The Death of the Necromancer" (Avon Eos) was a 1998 Nebula Award Nominee and the French edition was a 2002 Imaginales Award nominee. Her fourth novel "Wheel of the Infinite" (HarperCollins Eos) was a 2000 hardcover and 2001 December paperback release. Her newest novel "The Wizard Hunters" (HarperCollins Eos/May 2003)is the first book in a fantasy trilogy taking place in the world of Ile-Rien from "The Element of Fire" and "The Death of the Necromancer." As of 2003 her books have been translated into seven languages, including French, German, Russian, Italian, Polish, and Dutch.

Wendy Wheeler's short fiction has been selected for The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror (ed Datlow/Windling), and has appeared in Analog, Aboriginal SF, Gorezone and other periodicals, as well as in the anthologies Snow White, Blood Red and Silver Birch, Blood Moon (also edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling) and The Crafters series (ed Christopher Stasheff /Bill Faucett). She has taught fiction courses for the University of Texas Informal Classes for the past nine years and is co-founder of the SlugTribe SF/F group, the longest-running study group of the Writers League of Texas. She also writes screenplays and teleplays; her fantasy screenplay set in magical, colonial Boston reached finalist status in several screenplay competitions. Email is wendyw@io.com and her website is www.wendy-wheeler.com.

Mark London Williams is the author of the "Danger Boy" time travel adventure books, originally released by Tricycle Press, and due for major rerelease next year from Candlewick Press, where he will be continuing the series. In their original form, the first two books landed on the LA Times' children's bestseller list, and were nominated for a "Golden Duck" award. Williams has also written comics (Mojo Press) and video game scripts (Activision) and is extensively published as a journalist, in publications ranging from Variety to the LA Times Online, on subjects ranging from politics to showbiz. He lives in Los Angeles with two friends and four four-legged geriatric mammals . He counts his two sons as his best teachers.

Walter Jon Williams was on the New York Times Bestseller List last year, only to be knocked off by a volley of celebrity biographies. THE PRAXIS, his next novel, is the first in a new series, and will be available in September.
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